Read Persecution by Alessandro Piperno Ann Goldstein Online

persecution

In a sprawling villa on the outskirts of Rome, the members of the Pontecorvo family have gathered for dinner. Leo Pontecorvo, an internationally revered pediatric oncologist, is forty-eight. His wife, Rachel, is a physician and the loving mother to Filippo and Samuel, two amiable pre-teens. The evening news is on in the living room but nobody pays it any attention until DrIn a sprawling villa on the outskirts of Rome, the members of the Pontecorvo family have gathered for dinner. Leo Pontecorvo, an internationally revered pediatric oncologist, is forty-eight. His wife, Rachel, is a physician and the loving mother to Filippo and Samuel, two amiable pre-teens. The evening news is on in the living room but nobody pays it any attention until Dr. Pontecorvo's name surfaces from the background noise and a news item airs that will change the lives of the Pontecorvos forever. Leo Pontecorvo has been publicly accused of a vile crime. A spotlight is turned on him that reveals the mistakes, regrets, and contradictions of a lifetime. Every detail of his private and professional life is about to come under scrutiny, to be debated by both friends and foes, by ravenous reporters and punctilious prosecutors. But Leo could bear all this if it weren't for the suspicious gazes of his wife and children. Surely they, of all people, believe in his innocence! Alessandro Piperno is widely acknowledged as one of today's most talented European novelists. His voice is singular and shocking at times, yet always possessed of tenderness and enormous generosity of heart. His vision is broad and encompassing, his psychological insights penetrating and undeniable. In this deeply felt family drama, Alessandro Piperno paints a broad canvas and fills it with psychologically complex characters whom readers will instantly recognize and never forget....

Title : Persecution
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781609450748
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 416 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Persecution Reviews

  • Richard Derus
    2018-11-28 16:51

    Rating: 3.9* of fiveThe Publisher Says: In a sprawling villa on the outskirts of Rome, the members of the Pontecorvo family have gathered for dinner. Leo Pontecorvo, an internationally revered pediatric oncologist, is forty-eight. His wife, Rachel, is a physician and the loving mother to Filippo and Samuel, two amiable pre-teens. The evening news is on in the living room but nobody pays it any attention until Dr. Pontecorvo's name surfaces from the background noise and a news item airs that will change the lives of the Pontecorvos forever. Leo Pontecorvo has been publicly accused of a vile crime. A spotlight is turned on him that reveals the mistakes, regrets, and contradictions of a lifetime. Every detail of his private and professional life is about to come under scrutiny, to be debated by both friends and foes, by ravenous reporters and punctilious prosecutors. But Leo could bear all this if it weren't for the suspicious gazes of his wife and children. Surely they, of all people, believe in his innocence! Alessandro Piperno is widely acknowledged as one of today's most talented European novelists. His voice is singular and shocking at times, yet always possessed of tenderness and enormous generosity of heart. His vision is broad and encompassing, his psychological insights penetrating and undeniable. In this deeply felt family drama, Alessandro Piperno paints a broad canvas and fills it with psychologically complex characters whom readers will instantly recognize and never forget.My Review: Words can not only hurt, not only damage...they can kill. They can annihilate, destroy utterly the target of the carelessly spoken or maliciously uttered or calculatedly disseminated words. They can blow up a life, a family, a career, a vocation, they can eviscerate the worthy and worthwhile work a person has done.And what if they're true? What if they're not true? Half true? He said, she said? It doesn't matter at all. Words, when spoken, can only be forgiven but never forgotten.Piperno's novel of a Jewish pediatric oncologist's fall from the pinnacle of his life-saving profession is profoundly unsettling. It is discursive in style, and it is peculiarly intimate because of that. Very few paragraphs lead directly to the subject allegedly at hand, but all of them, each of them, serves to build the image of the Pontecorvo world, that of Dottore Leo, la signora Rachel, the pre-teen boys, Telma the Filipina maid...all these intersecting, interlocking worlds are completely and finally and irrevocably smashed and cannot be restored, only re-formed. The tracks in the thickets of words Piperno creates are like the game spoor a hunter follows, requiring patience and attention to interpret and encouraging the reader, the hunter, to look around carefully, to attend to the landscape as much as the path.Ann Goldstein ably translates the Italian text in such a way as to suggest the varying uses made of familiar and formal address. It's a very hard thing to do, and it's impressive to see the job done so well. Part of the job of a translator is to create the mood of the original in a different idiom...never does Goldstein do this better than in the passages where the snobbery and class-consciousness that Leo faces when others refer to or speak to his wife, daughter of an observant Jew who also happens to be a businessman, in contrast to his more assimilated, haute bourgeois background.I was transported in the reading of this novel, though not to a lovely sweet cotton-candy land of milk and honey. (Frankly, that's always sounded revolting to me. Not to mention sticky.) I was immersed in the life of the disintegrating Pontecorvo family. I emerged after a catharsis feeling, oddly, buoyed up, able to see the shore and feel the water of the sad existence below me support me as I started for solid ground.Europa Editions provided this copy in a Goodreads giveaway.This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

  • Alta
    2018-12-10 20:48

    Piperno’s Persecution has a masterful way of keeping the reader on edge. The novel is a contemporary family drama about a highly successful doctor, Leo Pontecorvo, who has it all: looks; a beautiful, devoted wife; two teenage boys; a great career and, of course, money. A man who’d always been watched over by Providence, Leo has made many enemies but nonchalantly ignored them until one summer day in 1986 when a TV news anchor accuses him of having tried to seduce his thirteen-year-old son’s girlfriend. This is the beginning of Leo’s downfall: eventually, he is accused of rape, but he is so puzzled and embarrassed that he doesn’t even attempt to defend himself before his family, and instead retreats into the house’s cellar.For the narrator—a mysterious, omniscient voice—Leo is the victim of a disturbed teenage girl and of his family’s lack of faith in him. I would also speculate that this novel is a response to the contemporary cult of the victim, and to the tendency to give immediate credence to stories of abuse. Many European intellectuals regard with suspicious eyes the (primarily American) tendency to make into a hero any self-proclaimed victim, and see this as a consequence of the functioning of contemporary media, and of a perverted idea of “democracy” (basically, a revenge of the “masses” against those more fortunate).

  • Moloch
    2018-11-30 19:56

    Secondo me un libro è "scritto bene" non quando cerca di stordirti con le frasi a effetto o un lessico lussureggiante, ma quando penso "ecco, io non riuscirei mai a scrivere una cosa così arguta/divertente/spietata/triste/vera con tanta naturalezza e tanto poco sforzo". Cosa che mi è successa con questo libro.

  • Margaret
    2018-11-16 17:14

    I received a copy of this novel through the GoodReads First Reads program, and greatly appreciate the opportunity to review this book. Persecution, aptly subtitled "The Friendly Fire of Memories", by Alessandro Piperno, starts of with a major revelation. Leo Pontecorvo is accused of having an affair with his young son's girlfriend. The age of girlfriend: 12. Pontecorvo is strung up in the media as the narration recounts his memories of events leading up to the alleged incident and afterwords. The reader does not get a definitive answer in this volume (first in a slated two novel pairing according to the front cover flap) as to whether or not Pontecorvo is a child molester, but we are given insight into a fairly unhealthy individual. Pontecorvo's need for acceptance, importance of self image, and inability to deal with confrontation could be attributed to one of the many reasons the narrator recalls throughout Pontecorvo's consideration of what brought him to this point in his life. Pontecorvo suffers from an overbearing and manipulative mother, though his parents also made the move to Switzerland during the beginning of World War II. Pontecorvo is a pediatric oncologist but can't deal effectively with his own children. He immediately goes into hiding in the basement of his house when he hears news of the rape accusation on TV, and does not leave except to hire a lawyer (with his own unique set of insecurities) and for a short stay in jail. When the reader finally learns of Pontecorvo's hallucinations of his mother and father that comfort him in jail, the reader becomes fairly certain that this man is certifiable. What makes this novel stand out from other novels centered around the recounting of a crime (ie Atonement) is that the narrator both can recall Pontecorvo's inner most thoughts, as well as Pontecorvo's wife and to some extent their sons, while also maintaining the impression that the narrator knows something that he or she is not sharing. The novel's ending is followed by a "To be continued" (and in Comic Sans, the only fault in an otherwise beautifully designed book) indicating that we will one day find out what exactly happened with the 12-year-old girl and caused the implosion of an outwardly successful man.

  • Bertrand Brasil
    2018-12-02 00:00

    Perseguição, de Alessandro Piperno, apresenta como protagonista Leo Pontecorvo, um oncologista pediátrico de 48 anos e de fama internacional. Quando acusado de um crime, a honestidade de professor e médico e os detalhes de sua vida íntima passam a ser questionados por todos, incluindo sua família. Assim, da noite para o dia, Leo se vê transformado no objeto preferido da censura pública: vítima de ódio, intriga, delação, calúnias e intimidações. A história começa quando, numa viagem com a família, ele recebe uma carta estranha da namorada de 12 anos de seu filho. Em vez de deixar para lá e esquecer, talvez devido à sua soberba e à necessidade de ser amado, o protagonista não só responde como troca muitas outras mensagens com a menina. Lendo assim pode parecer apelativo e surreal. Impressão. Perseguição possui uma história complexa, um lado psicológico denso e um debate importante de temas atuais. Inicialmente, todos podem pensar que será mais um thriller de aventura, uma história de perseguição ou a já batida tentativa do protagonista em provar sua inocência. Ao invés da linearidade, Piperno lança mão de intercalações de fatos e épocas, mesclando o presente – o sofrimento de Leo ante o desenrolar dos fatos – com o passado – eventos que culminaram no episódio central e que ajudam o leitor a compreender o porquê de certas atitudes do médico. Dada a destreza do autor, em nenhum momento o leitor fica confuso; é como se tudo se complementasse. Outra mistura realizada por Piperno ocorre entre texto e imagem, relação que só será compreendida no terço final da história. Todos os erros cometidos pelo protagonista têm origem no jovem mimado que desconfia sempre que está sendo contrariado. Apesar de ser um médico famoso e ultradedicado que lida com crianças diariamente, ele é imaturo, carente e bastante ausente em casa. Muito provavelmente, Leo encontrou nessas crianças do hospital pessoas emocionalmente parecidas com ele. E talvez por isso tenha aceitado a situação criada pela namorada do filho. Ao final do livro o leitor perguntará: será que vivemos sempre à mercê do inconsciente? Mesmo que racionalmente neguemos, seria possível? Quanto aos personagens, estaria certa a esposa em nem ao menos duvidar da história? Estaria certo o marido em achar a postura da esposa injusta?

  • Saverio Mariani
    2018-11-21 20:04

    Prendete una storia che lascia il segno nella vita di un uomo importante, tale Leo Pontecorvo, accusato di un reato terribile. Prendete l'alta borghesia romana, ebrea, alla metà degli anni '80. Prendete uno svolgimento narrativo sublime, incastonato dentro a dei rivoli psicologici che aprono parentesi incredibili utili a spiegare in modo necessario lo svolgersi degli eventi. Prendete una scrittura bellissima, composta da milioni di parole, colta e sempre ben calibrata; con una struttura ad elastico che ricorda quella di Philip Roth. Ecco, gli ingredienti sono ottimi. Anche il risultato lo è.Persecuzioneè questo risultato eccellente. Libro stupendo di Alessandro Piperno che non lascia via di scampo fino all'ultima parola che, paradossalmente, è continua.... Si, perché il libro non termina lì. Il dittico si conclude con Inseparabili , il libro col quale Piperno ha vinto lo Strega nel 2012. Non mi resta che, con lo stesso entusiasmo col quale iniziai La macchia umana, dopo aver letto Ho sposato un comunista (gli ultimi due volumi della così detta Trilogia americana di Philip Roth), mettere i piedi e gli occhi sui tre puntini di sospensione dopo la parola continua... e leggere quello che viene dopo, come se fosse facile avere sempre di fronte un dopo. Ma non se ne può fare a meno, e questo libro me lo ha spiegato ancora una volta.

  • Susan
    2018-12-02 21:54

    Disturbing, well written book. An well-known, highly respected child oncologist accused of being sexually "involved" with 12 year old girl,friend of his son's. Much of the book is spent exploring his marriage and relationships to explain why, when these accusations (supposedly unfounded) are made, Leo falls apart, does not defend himself, totally cuts himself off from his family. His reaction is - supposedly - understandable if you understand his dependent relationship on his mother and, later, his wife. It was compelling and disturbing reading - but didn't really feel convincing to me.

  • Alberto
    2018-12-04 18:10

    Leggere un autore italiano e uscire dalla solita narrazione italiana. In breve questo il primo merito di "Persecuzione". Poi può essere pieno di parole, a volte anche improponibile, forse monco ma resta sempre una bella lettura.

  • Brunhilde
    2018-11-25 19:00

    Cinque anni dopo «Con le peggiori intenzioni», Alessandro Piperno torna con un altro capolavoro nella comunità ebraica della Roma dorata anni Ottanta e  ci porta per mano nell'interno-inferno borghese della famiglia di Leo Pontecorvo, brillante promessa mantenuta dell'oncologia pediatrica nazionale.Pagina dopo pagina scopriamo il mondo del protagonista, a cui fino a quel momento la vita non ha lesinato nulla: benessere, talento, avvenenza, generosità, carisma e, soprattutto, una famiglia felice che ricambia il suo smisurato amore. E forse è proprio tutto questo, questa hybris innata del nostro, all'origine delle disgrazie che, forti della sua debolezza (come può un uomo che non è abituato ad angustie o patemi opporre resistenza ad un così poderoso diluvio di guai?),  lo travolgeranno inesorabilmente. Perché Leo, purtroppo, non ha afferrato il monito materno («NON C'È POSTO AL MONDO CHE POSSA GARANTIRE ALCUNA PROTEZIONE, NE' A TE NE' A NESSUN ALTRO!») ed ha vissuto i suoi quarantotto anni con la guardia costantemente abbassata, nell'infantile convinzione che il proprio fosse un mondo protetto soltanto dalla forza di volontà e da un ottimismo autorigenerante. Leo scopre lentamente la banalità del male nell'invidia risentita dei mediocri, nell'ostinazione contorta e meschina dei burocrati, ed è un male che trae maggior veemenza dalle sue ingenue e continue esitazioni, in uno stillicidio esasperante fatto di ricordi che, come recita il sottotitolo, lo esporranno ad un quotidiano fuoco amico che non salverà niente. Perché non c'è nulla di epico in questa battaglia inutile, l'atmosfera d'indifferenza pervade e sopraffà gradualmente l'angoscia della prima ora ed avvolge tutto nel suo oblio.Quanto conosciamo davvero i nostri cari? Basta una vita intera di amore fedele per sperare in un briciolo di misericordia da parte loro?Tra tutte le cose che la sua vicenda avrebbe potuto insegnargli, la sola che Leo sente di aver imparato è che gli uomini sono monadi «senza porte ne' finestre».

  • Mariana Mothè
    2018-11-16 16:56

    La storia è molto interessante, inoltre è scritto bene. L'unica cosa è che è pieno di flashback che rallentano il racconto, ma allo stesso tempo tengono viva la curiosità del lettore.

  • Bridget
    2018-12-13 21:13

    This book is a real change of pace from most books I've read, especially recently. The bulk of the book takes place completely within the mind of the protagonist, with a detached observer telling us the fill-in details.It all begins during family dinner one evening, when Leo Pontecorvo, a renowned pediatric oncologist in Rome, is sitting down for dinner with his wife and two young sons. They have all the trappings of a well-to-do, well-respected family. Then, Leo's picture appears on the screen in the news report, where we learn he is accused of having indecent sexual conduct with the girlfriend of his thirteen year-old son.Leo retreats to the basement, where he basically exists for the rest of the novel. Seldom leaving the house at all, and watching his wife and children from the basement window whenever they are outside the house or going to the car in the garage. Leo realizes that there have been things in his life that have all come crashing down at once for him, both personally and professionally. We hear his side of the accusations made by the girl, where we learn he is innocent. As time wears on, he goes back and forth between wanting to fight for his life and his family, and giving up.We learn that Leo was a child of privilege, and how he seldom even as an adult ever had to take care of daily things like paying bills or organizing vacations. His wife or his mother always handled these mundane things. But his mother is dead, and he can no longer count on his wife. At a minimum, he doesn't even try to contact his wife or his children for the rest of the book.This was an interesting, if sometimes frustrating book. Leo is a person who in some ways is sympathetic, but in other ways comes across as having sealed his own fate as a result of his arrogance and self-centered-ness. He seems to want to avoid conflict at all costs, even if it means facing his family. The ending was a surprise, at least to me. But after the last sentence, it also says "To be continued," so I am wondering what the next part will be. Other versions of Leo's story? The story of how his family carries on? I will definitely want to find out.One particular thing of interest to me, was that apparently in Italy (at least at the time of the novel, the late 1980s), a defendant was not required to attend his own trial. Fascinating.

  • Full Stop
    2018-11-22 16:55

    http://www.full-stop.net/2012/10/29/r...Review by Saul Alpert-Abrams=If the title of Alessandro Piperno’s second novel, Persecution, suggests a political allegory, its subtitle, The Friendly Fire of Memories, alludes to its Proustian pretentions. Yet both implications remain unfulfilled. This is the tantalizing nature of Persecution, a story that examines the downfall of the renowned doctor Leo Pontecorvo after he is accused of having sexual encounters with the 12-year-old girlfriend of his younger son, a story with which we are uncomfortably familiar in this day and age.The novel’s prose is in an unrelenting — one might indeed say militant — style maintaining an equal pitch of fervor and bitter irony at all moments. It demands that the reader follow Piperno on complex syntactical jaunts through the relived pasts of his characters. Piperno’s retrospective technique might be described very well by the title of the book. For Piperno, “persecution” at times evokes a comparison between the Jews’ plight in World War II and the apparently unbearable social pressures faced by an upper-class Roman Jew of the 1980s; an offensive comparison which belies the arrogance with which the author approaches the delicate task of novel writing. The novel is ultimately more a display of masculine intellectual dominance than a portrait of the complexities of social class and modern religious attitudes.Read more here: http://www.full-stop.net/2012/10/29/r...

  • Lisa
    2018-12-03 18:10

    I started out loving this book. It was a 5-star, completely in love, reread that passage because it is all fabulous kind of novel. It was a lot like a Kafka novel where a link of serial oddities becomes absurd. Everyone has made a decision to avoid a discomfort and ignore an irritation. Yet sometimes that decision to avoid creates a bigger, horrible situation. It would have been so much easier to prevent it all had we not avoided it to start. It's also a modern day Crucible where the brilliant, successful, handsome, wealthy, connected, advantaged, cures sick kids, happily married with bright kids protagonist becomes vilified exactly because life seems to have come too easily. Suddenly everyone lies in wait to see the guy too big for himself be taken down. It's an anti-intellectual masses gang up on the guy they used to emulate. But then the final third of the book happened. The entire plot unraveled in the end and the author seemed to have lost sight of the storyline. I also want to be rewarded with some closure after 400 pages. I didn't realize till the end that there is a second part. I'm not interested enough to continue with the story at this point. Apparently the publisher agrees; the second part hasn't been translated to English even though the Italian version was released 4 years ago. Bummer. I was loving this book.

  • Andre
    2018-12-12 17:14

    Inicialmente, todos podem pensar que será mais um thriller de aventura, uma história de perseguição ou a já batida tentativa do protagonista de provar sua inocência. Em vez da linearidade, Piperno lança mão de intercalações de fatos e épocas, mesclando o presente – o sofrimento de Leo ante o desenrolar dos fatos – com o passado – eventos que culminaram no episódio central e que ajudam o leitor a compreender o porquê de certas atitudes do médico. Dada a destreza do autor, em nenhum momento o leitor fica confuso; é como se tudo se complementasse. Outra mistura realizada por Piperno ocorre entre texto e imagem, relação que só será compreendida no terço final da história. Esse foi o primeiro livro que li do autor e algumas características me surpreenderam positivamente: na trama, às vezes temos a certeza que algum fato não tem nada a ver com o resto. Logo à frente o autor prova que não, que tudo tem um porquê. Ou quando começa a contar fatos sem julgamento ou explicações, deixando isso a cargo do leitor.

  • Robert Wechsler
    2018-12-06 20:01

    This is a somewhat Philip Rothian (Human Stainian) story of a very successful Jewish man whose fatal flaw — an inability to do anything competently beyond his work, and his expectation that others will both act for him and forgive him for his weaknesses — catches up with him. Although very personal, there is enough real-world activity for one to feel that the novel is, to some extent, a metaphor for Italy’s failures and scandals.The prose is excellent and intelligent. But, like so many novels, this one started to drag about 2/3 of the way through. The problem, I think, is that the novel loses both its momentum/energy and its focus. This is supposed to be the first of a trilogy of novels entitled The Friendly Fire of Memories, a great title that implies Piperno is taking on Proust, to some extent.

  • Paolo
    2018-11-27 23:01

    Non male, un po' discontinuo, ma che sicuramente fa riflettere noi maschietti investiti del ruolo di marito/padre.Sarebbe stato più facile ambientarlo ai nostri tempi: internet,social network con falsi profili, cyber molestie diffuse (presunte o reali) avrebbero reso la vicenda forse più plausibile.Invece felice mi è sembrata l'ambientazione nel vivo degli anni '80, quelli della "Milano da bere" (traspare dal romanzo che neanche Roma fosse granché sobria).Il peggior decennio della nostra storia in cui si è dissipato quel poco di buono fatto in precedenza e si è preparato lo sfacelo del ventennio a venire. Mi pare dia credibilità al contrasto tra la sostanziale vuotezza e dabbenaggine e l' apparente successo ed autorevolezza del protagonista.

  • Laura
    2018-12-14 22:00

    Non mi ha convinta. Lo stile non mi fa impazzire e i salti temporali a volte annoiano. I personaggi sono antipatici, dal primo all'ultimo, soprattutto il protagonista. Ma l'antipatia suscitata da Leo Pontecorvo è niente in confronto alla rabbia per il comportamento, per me agghiacciante, della moglie e dei figli. Non mi sono affezionata a nessuno. Ho letto poco amore, per la famiglia e per la giustizia.Il narratore, che inizialmente non mi convinceva perché lo sentivo troppo "protagonista", alla fine si è rivelato una nota positiva: una stellina in più per l'alone di mistero che Piperno è riuscito a creare.

  • Monica Co
    2018-11-18 21:00

    La parte migliore di questo romanzo e' il suo titolo, molto Rothiano certo, ma senza dubbio suggestivo.Dopo aver apprezzato "Con le peggiori intenzioni", ho trovato questo secondo romanzo ingenuo e abbastanza scontato. Certo la scrittura di Piperno e' sempre fluida, morbida e affascinante, ma la storia manca di originalita' e non riesce a convincere il lettore. La galleria di personaggi che fanno da contorno al dramma di Leo Pontecorvo e' al limite del banale, oppure degenera nella macchietta.Sono curiosa comunque di vedere cosa succedera' nel secondo romanzo del dittico.

  • Raffaele
    2018-12-01 18:00

    La trama è davvero esile (perciò sono quattro stelle e mezza ...) ed il tipo di vita descritta - quella dell'alta borghesia ebraica romana - può non interessare a molti. Però la capacità di Piperno di descrivere persone, situazioni e stati d'animo è impressionante. La scrittura è così pulita e coinvolgente che il libro dovrebbe essere utilizzato nelle scuole di scrittura creativa per mostrare come si raggiunge il climax di una scena. L'ho letto avidamente e penso che farò così anche con il seguito, atteso fra qualche mese.

  • Andy Stegner
    2018-11-27 17:50

    I received this book from Goodreads as a First Reads book which I was thankful for. now on to the book.I really was not so much a fan. I think the premise and ideas behind the book were interesting but I think it went on way too long and it became stale. I am all for long books and I love literature but I felt that this was just a very OK book.I think if the writer cut out 100 pages that the book would read better without diluting the storyline

  • Stef Smulders
    2018-11-29 20:12

    After the first part I thought this was a very well written psychological novel, but in the other three parts it seemed to change genre several times. The end leaves you flabbergasted and without a clue. The author with his last words "to be continued" forces you to read the second part in the hope of obtaining answers. In the meanwhile this first part was an exciting read, reminding me of Ian McEwan.

  • incipit mania
    2018-12-17 17:01

    IncipitEra il 13 luglio del 1986 quando un imbarazzante desiderio ...Persecuzione incipitmania.com

  • Carofish
    2018-11-26 19:07

    This is a well written and disturbing book. I can't wait to see how it continues. Much food for thought. If only he had shared the letter with his wife. How life changes with the smallest decision.

  • Veerle Roets
    2018-11-25 00:05

    In het begin is het nogal langdraderig en vraag je je af of al die uitweidingen nodig zijn. Ja, blijkt later, om de drijfveren van de personnages te kennen.

  • Kia76
    2018-12-08 01:00

    Una scrittura magistrale.

  • Ann Marie
    2018-12-09 17:12

    Addictive and original.... Didn't realize it was only part one! Now I have to either find the second one in Italian or wait for the translation......

  • Anastasia
    2018-11-22 20:59

    ενα απο τα καλυτερα βιβλία που διάβασα φέτος....

  • Sylvie
    2018-12-02 23:54

    Long, très long. Même si l'histoire est intéressante, je me suis perdue dans ces 4 longs chapitres, les digressions permanentes m'ont faire perdre le fil. Je suis passée a côté.

  • !Tæmbuŝu
    2018-11-16 18:05

    KOBOBOOKS

  • 61pat
    2018-12-12 19:51

    Il libro mi è piaciuto. Forse la trama o forse il risentimento nei confronti dell'immagine che viene proposta della moglie e dei figli del protagonista fa si che alla fine io dica così cosi